Featured Product

    Bundesbank VP on Regulatory and Financial Stability Issues on Fintech

    August 20, 2019

    At a seminar on "Statistics on Fintech," Professor Claudia Buch, the Vice-President of Deutsche Bundesbank, discussed how digital innovations can be a catalyst for structural change in the financial system and can affect the risk-stability trade-off. In the context of the central bank mandate on financial stability, he outlined the key regulatory issues related to fintech and bigtech firms, highlighted the importance of surveillance of non-traditional financial institutions, and emphasized that better statistics are needed to improve surveillance. Better statistics help in addressing the "big data paradox" but the existing statistical systems provide little information for a structured surveillance of the digital innovation trends.

    Ms. Buch stated that the evolution of service provision by fintech and bigtech firms is a particularly important issue for central banks. Essentially, all business areas are affected, including financial stability, prudential supervision, payments, markets, and monetary analysis. Digital innovations and improvements in information technology have the potential to significantly change the competitive structure of banking markets. Fintech and bigtech firms potentially have comparative advantages over banks in deploying big data techniques, artificial intelligence, machine learning, or social media data for credit scoring or risk assessments. Obtaining reliable information on the activities of fintech and bigtech firms from traditional statistics and reporting systems is difficult though. Given this patchy knowledge base, it is vital to monitor the resilience of financial institutions. However, data requirements go beyond immediate central banking tasks. Data on these firms is also needed in areas such as cyber security or competition policy. Hence, there is a need to monitor new trends and this requires harmonized statistical definitions. 

    To close the data gaps, the Irving Fisher Committee (IFC) has set up a Working Group on FinTech Data Issues to take stock of the existing data sources, identify data gaps, provide guidance on fintech classification issues, and develop a way forward. In addition, IFC has conducted a membership survey in 2019, which informs about approaches that central banks pursue with regard to fintech data. The survey covered the current statistical infrastructure, "fintech gaps" in statistics, fintech data demands from a user perspective, ongoing initiatives to measure fintech, and the role of international coordination. Going forward, Ms. Buch sees four main priorities for regulators and supervisors:

    • First, improving the statistics database on providers of digital financial services is key. Better data are needed to assess risks, vulnerabilities, and resilience. Entry into the provision of financial services should be conditional on the provision of sufficient data and information that allows regulators to make the necessary assessments of risks. The recent survey by IFC shows that the statistical infrastructure is not yet geared to this new phenomenon. There is a lack of shared concepts and data. Strong cooperation on the national and the international level will thus be needed, which is one of the priorities of future work in the IFC.
    • Second, activities should be regulated irrespective of the institution offering it. This should eliminate possibilities for regulatory arbitrage so that risks are not shifted from regulated sectors toward new market participants for which these rules do not apply. Hence, regulation of new market participants should follow the principle of "same risk, same rules."
    • Third, speeding up structural change might be perceived as being excessively disruptive at the current juncture. It may be argued that testing the new resolution regimes too early could undermine the credibility of reforms. Yet, simply preserving the current market structures entails risks as well. Protecting the market shares of (large) incumbent financial institutions might counteract the reforms' objectives to address the too-big-to-fail issue. The potential for harnessing efficiency gains may be squandered.
    • Fourth, close cooperation between regulators is needed. This includes international cooperation in case innovations can have cross-border implications. However, cooperation is also needed between regulators such as competition authorities and financial regulators that have to assess and deal with relevant aspects of the same market.

     

    Related Link: Speech

     

    Keywords: International, Germany, Banking, Fintech, Bigtech, Financial Stability, Statistics, Resolution Regime, IFC, Bundesbank, BIS

    Related Articles
    News

    HKMA on Fintech Adoption and Innovation by Banks in Hong Kong

    HKMA announced the publication of a report on fintech adoption and innovation in the banking industry in Hong Kong.

    May 20, 2020 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    BIS on Impact of Increasing Use of Cloud Technology on Cyber Risk

    BIS published a working paper that examines the drivers of cyber risk, especially in context of the cloud services.

    May 20, 2020 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    ECB Consults on Guide for Managing Climate and Environmental Risks

    ECB launched consultation on a guide specifying how the Banking Supervision expects banks to consider climate-related and environmental risks in their governance and risk management frameworks and when formulating and implementing their business strategy.

    May 20, 2020 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    ECB Issues Opinion on Revisions to CRR in Response to COVID Crisis

    ECB published an opinion (CON/2020/16) on amendments to the prudential framework in EU in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    May 20, 2020 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    EBA Assesses Interlinkages Between Recovery and Resolution Planning

    EBA published a report that examines the interlinkages between recovery and resolution planning under the Bank Recovery and Resolution Directive (BRRD).

    May 20, 2020 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    SRB Publishes Final MREL Policy Under the Banking Package

    SRB published the final Minimum Requirements for Own Funds and Eligible Liabilities (MREL) policy under the Banking Package.

    May 20, 2020 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    US Agencies Amend Interim Final Rule on Transition Period for CECL

    US Agencies (FDIC, FED, and OCC) published a final rule that makes technical changes to the March 31, 2020 interim final rule that provides a five-year transition period for the impact of the current expected credit loss (CECL) methodology on regulatory capital.

    May 19, 2020 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    ECB Releases Results of March Survey on Credit Terms and Conditions

    ECB published results of the March 2020 survey on credit terms and conditions in euro-denominated securities financing and over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives markets.

    May 19, 2020 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    FINMA Adjusts Deadlines for COVID-19 Relief Measures for Banks

    FINMA published guidance (06/2020) on extending or discontinuing various exemptions that were granted due to the COVID-19 crisis.

    May 19, 2020 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    SRB Consults on Standardized Data Set for Bank Valuation in Resolution

    SRB launched a consultation on the minimum data needed for valuation of a bank in resolution.

    May 19, 2020 WebPage Regulatory News
    RESULTS 1 - 10 OF 5203