Featured Product

    BIS Paper on Embedded Supervision of Blockchain-Based Financial Market

    September 16, 2019

    BIS published a working paper that investigates ways to regulate and supervise blockchain-based financial markets. The paper argues that asset tokenization and underlying distributed ledger technology (DLT) open up new ways of supervising financial risks. It makes the case for "embedded supervision"—that is, a framework that allows compliance with regulatory goals to be automatically monitored by reading the ledger of a market, thus reducing the need for firms to actively collect, verify, and deliver data. The paper concludes with a discussion of the legislative and operational requirements that would promote low-cost supervision and a level playing field for small and large firms.

    Embedded supervision is distinct from other forms of suptech or regtech, which aim to use machine learning or artificial intelligence to more efficiently monitor the financial industry. The key principle of embedded supervision is to rely on the trust-creating mechanism of decentralized markets for regulatory purposes too. If DLT-based markets were to develop, this would change the way assets are traded and how they are packaged into complex financial products. In DLT-based markets, data credibility is assured by economic incentives. This paper discusses the following four principles for deployment of embedded supervision:

    • Embedded supervision can only function as part of an overall regulatory framework that is backed up by an effective legal system and supporting institutions.
    • Embedded supervision can be applied to decentralized markets that achieve economic finality.
    • Embedded supervision needs to be designed in the context of economic market consensus, taking into account how the market will react to being automatically supervised.
    • Embedded supervision should promote low-cost compliance and a level playing field for small and large firms.

    In most jurisdictions, the legal setup is such that a single and regulated clearing and settlement provider is required to verify that an irreversible transfer of ownership has occurred. DLT, however, achieves such a transfer via the economic incentives of verifiers rather than by the authority of a central institution. Only if the principles of finality underlying the regulation and supervision of financial markets infrastructures are modified to recognize decentralized exchange could DLT ever gain traction in regulated finance. Along with this, regulators and supervisors would also have to design rules regarding the assignment of responsibility in decentralized markets in the case of illegal activity.

    To implement embedded supervision, regulators would also be required to acquire substantial technological know-how and the willingness to adjust their operational approach to the technology that is being developed by the financial sector. Many supervisors worldwide are open to this possibility and some are already developing the requisite sandboxes. One example is “LBchain,” a blockchain-based sandbox of the Bank of Lithuania, which seeks to embed regulatory infrastructure in a DLT-based market. The benefits might include lower costs for market participants and supervisors, real-time monitoring, deeper insights into the use of internal models, and improved detection of potential window-dressing and other abuses. 

     

    Related Link: Working Paper

     

    Keywords: International, Banking, Securities, Blockchain, Embedded Supervision, Regtech, Suptech, Research, Distributed Ledger Technology, Regulatory Sandbox, BIS

    Related Articles
    News

    EC to Defer Application of SFDR Standards Till July 2022

    The European Commission (EC) announced plans to defer the application of 13 regulatory technical standards under the Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation (2019/2088) by six months, from January 01, 2022 to July 01, 2022.

    July 23, 2021 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    BoE Consults on Approach to Setting MREL, Publishes Bail-In Guidance

    The Bank of England (BoE) published a consultation paper on approach to setting minimum requirement for own funds and eligible liabilities (MREL), an operational guide on executing bail-in, and a statement from the Deputy Governor Dave Ramsden.

    July 22, 2021 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    EBA Seeks Views on Proportionality Assessment Methodology

    The European Banking Authority (EBA) is seeking preliminary input on standardization of the proportionality assessment methodology for credit institutions and investment firms.

    July 22, 2021 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    US Agencies Propose Changes to Call Reports and Instructions

    Certain regulatory authorities in the US are extending period for completion of the review of certain residential mortgage provisions and for publication of notice disclosing the determination of this review until December 20, 2021.

    July 22, 2021 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    PRA Finalizes Rulebook Definition of Higher Paid Material Risk-Taker

    The Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) published the policy statement PS18/21, which introduces an amendment in the definition of "higher paid material risk taker" in the Remuneration Part of the PRA Rulebook.

    July 21, 2021 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    EBA Examines Asset Encumbrance in Banking Sector

    The European Banking Authority (EBA) published its annual report on asset encumbrance in banking sector.

    July 21, 2021 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    EBA Publishes Methodological Guide to Mystery Shopping

    The European Banking Authority (EBA) published a methodological guide to mystery shopping.

    July 21, 2021 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    APRA Issues Update on Capital Reform Policy Settings for Banks

    The Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA) released a letter to authorized deposit-taking institutions to provide an update on key policy settings for the capital framework reforms, which will come into effect from January 01, 2023.

    July 21, 2021 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    CPMI-IOSCO Assess Continuity Planning of Market Infrastructures

    The Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures (CPMI) and the International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) published a report that assesses the business continuity planning activities of financial market infrastructures or FMIs.

    July 21, 2021 WebPage Regulatory News
    News

    ESMA Responds to Proposal Related to Sustainability Standards Board

    The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has responded to the IFRS consultation on targeted amendments to the IFRS Foundation constitution to accommodate an International Sustainability Standards Board (ISSB) to set IFRS Sustainability Standards.

    July 21, 2021 WebPage Regulatory News
    RESULTS 1 - 10 OF 7283